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WASHINGTON, DC, Day 33 of 40 — When I first began to contemplate this project a couple of years ago, I never realized it would be so timely. Even as recently as this spring, when I traveled to Mexico to shoot the pilot documentary, I didn’t realize it would become so important. FREELANCERS began as […]

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FREELANCERS and the Mexican Drug War

WASHINGTON, DC, Day 16 of 40 — Ioan Grillo is an extraordinarily successful freelance journalist. He has reported on Latin America since 2001 for international media including The New York Times, Time magazine, Reuters, CNN, the Associated Press (AP), PBS NewsHour, the Houston Chronicle, CBC, and the Sunday Telegraph, and more. Dan Rather called Grillo’s […]

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FREELANCERS and the New Foreign Correspondents

WASHINGTON, DC, Day 14 of 40 — I interview freelance photojournalist Meghan Dhaliwal in her Mexico City apartment for the upcoming pilot of my series, FREELANCERS with Bill Gentile. While downing my first round of espresso coffee this morning, I was delighted to see Meghan’s images published in this VICE story about trans women in […]

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FREELANCERS and Sacrifice

WASHINGTON, DC. Day 13 of 40 — Janet Jarman (pictured here) is one of the freelance journalists featured in my upcoming documentary series, FREELANCERS with Bill Gentile. The global series is testament to the dedicated men and women who scour the earth — without the support or security that staff journalists typically enjoy — searching […]

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FREELANCERS and the Changing Face of War Coverage

WASHINGTON, DC, Day 9 of 40 — As this article points out, the craft of conflict coverage is more dangerous than ever before. Despite this, into the fray go many freelancers who, like myself four decades ago, seek to take part in the broad conversation that is journalism — and to establish themselves as protagonists […]

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Freelancing, Then. And Now.

WASHINGTON, DC, Day 8 of 40 — This is what “freelancing” looked like in the 1980s. No body armor. No helmet. And moving with great freedom among combatants on each side of the conflict. We enjoyed relative immunity from intentional violence. I stress “relative immunity” from “intentional” violence. Too many of my friends and colleagues […]

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